Well, I promised some forthcoming substantial blog posts and I apologize because this is not one of them, instead this is a review of John Mayer’s most recent album, sharing the title of this post.  So from now on my reviews, both literature and music will bear the title’s of the specific work, thus the above title.  Well, here we go (I also start off by explaining the reasoning for my reviewing on this site)…

In attempts to increase my written work output, as well as improve my own creativity, discipline and writing quality, I have decided not only to review the books I am currently reading through, but also new music I hear and or purchase.  Anyway, that being said I will start by reviewing my most recent musical purchase, John Mayer’s Where the Light Is; Live in Los Angeles.  Mayer’s website says that the album was recorded in Los Angeles on December 8, 2007 at the Nokia Theatre LA.  The album is a 22 song set and lasts for 2 full hours.
I will make no apologies in my love for this album.  I am impressed by the innovative format Mayer presents to the audience.  The show starts with a classic acoustic set with 5 songs that should please his pop-loving fans.  He opens with a mellow, jazzy version of Neon, moves into a mellow version of Stop This Train, and then introduces many listeners to In Your Atmosphere, an acoustic ballad with incredible guitar rhythms and melodies.  From there, a second guitar joins him and adds some twangy slides to Daughters.  He finishes the acoustic set with an impressive cover of Free Fallin’.
Mayer begins the second set with a rockin cover of BB King’s Everyday I have the Blues.  This loud and grooving number starts his trio set, where he plays the next 8 songs with his Trio (bassist Pino Palladino, and Drummer Steve Jordan).  The set functions as a similar but updated version to the Trio’s album Try! Performing many of the same songs, but updating with variations. Anyway, the set continues with another cover, Wait Until’ Tomorrow is again awesome, and that leads into their previous single, Who Did You Think I Was.  The Trio moves into Come When I Call, a classically inspired number that evokes classic trio blues, then moves to a funkier version of Good Love Is On The Way, followed by their slow blues number, Out Of My Mind (a song you get by only purchasing the album) and they rock the song for 10 minutes of slow blues.  They finish the trio set with their upbeat blues numbers Vultures and Bold As Love.
The third and final set arrives in similar upbeat bluesy style as his full band plays Waitin’ On The World To Change.  The blues feel continues with Slow Dancing in a Burning Room, then the band changes the feel and jumps into Why Georgia, channeling his earlier acoustic-pop work.  They keep a the acoustic pop style by playing The Heart of Life, then switch back to their grooving, rocking blues with a cover of Ray Charles, I Don’t Need No Doctor.  They then move into a set from Continuum, as the play Gravity, I Don’t Trust Myself (With Loving You), Belief, and I’m Gonna Find Another You.  The style of the last four songs also channels the feeling of Continuum, providing the blues base, with pop and rock variances and layers.
Again, my opinion is incredibly biased, I love John Mayer’s music and I love it even more as he has begun exploring the classic blues style.  This album, I feel combines everything that Mayer fans hope for, with the three sets, two hours of melt-your-face-guitar rock and blues, with Mayer playing on both his acoustic and electric guitars.  His lyrics and vocals also channel blues greats of the past, adding a more soulful quality than his earlier stuff.  I listen to this album often and I love it more every time I hear it.  I personally recommend listening to the whole album loudly on some quality speakers with plenty of bass.  So there is my first review and I hope it proves to be a little informative for you readers.

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