This post is a very long time coming.  I finished this book by Nathaniel Hawthorne a couple of weeks ago, but have been a little busy, and have been a little lazy so here is my dime review of The House of The Seven Gables.

This was my first full reading of a Nathaniel Hawthorne book; in high school I think we read The Scarlet Letter for a class but I don’t think I read all of it.  I was supposed to read this book in a class during my senior year of college, and I never even bought the book, but really enjoyed our class discussions so I got it and figured I would give it a go.  I found the story to be a little slow at first, as there was much detailed exposition, and I personally have a little bit harder time getting into the wordiness of Hawthorne-era literature.  Once the story picks up a bit, though, it is pretty gripping.  The story is suspense filled, even to the point of feeling like a ghost story, though the existence of ghosts within the story is never confirmed by the narrator.

The romance weaves its way through various centuries and between reality and myth (within the story’s fictional framework, of course) following the Pyncheon and Maule families and their intertwining history all based around the property on which Seven Gabled House sits.  The house’s deteriorating state mirrors that of the Pyncheon line, and the current Pyncheon, Cousin Jaffrey is shown to be a reincarnation of the original evil Colonel Pyncheon, the insatiably land-hungry father of the Pyncheon line. The story’s imagery works pretty well and it makes connections throughout the book to draw in the reader.  There are emphases placed on generational sins passed down, as well as the reality of the mystical and/or spiritual world.

The story was a great read, Hawthorne’s writing gradually pulls the reader in and as the story climaxes it becomes nearly impossible to put down.  It is a fun, classic, American romance and I really enjoyed reading it.  And this was my super-quick-psuedo-review of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The House of The Seven Gables.

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